Preparedness for Children

Disaster Checklist for Families

  • Comfort Items: stuffed animal, doll, pacifier or blanket
  • Personal Hygiene: baby wipes, feminine products, diapers, nursing pads
  • Children's Activities: books, puzzles, games
  • Infant Nutrition: nursing supplies, formula, pre-packaged baby food
  • Medical needs: infant/child fever reducer, rash ointment
  • Family meet-up: Pick a safe spot to meet if separated such as a local school or library
  • Out-of-towner: A family contact who would not be affected by a local school or library
  • ICE: Cell phones should have "ICE" (In Case of Emergency) programmed into their contacts
  • Text: Text messages can often get through, even when a phone call can't

Once your family is out of harm's way, children can still be frightened or confused. Here are some tips to help them feel safe again:

  • Limit TV time: Intense media coverage of disasters can frighten young children and disturb teenagers as well.
  • Listen: Find out your child's concerns about the situation.
  • Comfort: Let them know their safety is your top priority.
  • Be aware: Changes in sleeping, eating and other behaviors can indicate distress. Seek professional support and counseling if they persist.
  • Make time: Help kids understand they're safe and secure by talking, playing and other family activities.
  • Keep calm and carry on: Your child will learn how to deal with these events from you.
  • Care: Make a point of showing sensitivity toward other families impacted by the disaster.
  • Routine: Help your children return to normal activities including school, sports and play groups.
  • Volunteer: Helping others can give your child a sense of control, security and empathy.

For more information on preparing children for emergencies please see the following: